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Fountain pens make me smile.  I like looking at them, I like holding them and I love drawing with them …. almost as much as a dip pen with a flexible nib.

Street view of building and signs

The beauty of a fountain pen is that it carries ink safely inside itself.  I can carry a fountain pen in my pocket.  It’s much harder and far messier to carry a dip pen and a bottle of ink in my pocket.  No matter where I am, or how short or long I am there for, I can pull out a sketchbook and pen and explore something of interest in my surroundings.

Studying architecture with a fountain pen is far more fun than with a pencil.  I don’t mind when lines go awry.

Sketchbook drawing:  Drawn while sitting on the sidewalk in Bethlehem during the Art Walk on Saturday evening.  Vintage Sheaffer fountain pen filled with Noodler’s Rome Burning Ink.

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Already I miss the beauty of the light reflecting off the water in Maine.  I made it back to New Jersey in record time …. no  delays due to construction and I missed both morning and evening rush hour traffic.

Rick Steves Backpack Suitcase

Plenty to catch up on today along with a few new ideas to make the Color Scheme Game  demos and workshops even better.

Sketchbook Drawing: drawn first with fountain pen, followed by watercolor on Rives BFK paper.

Mike had perfect 20 / 20  vision.  However, his eyes didn’t work together as a team.  First Grade was hell, to put it mildly.

Family Treasures No. 27, Colored Glasses

After watching a late night news broadcast featuring the experiments of Dr. Irlen in England, we purchased sunglasses with yellow, red, purple or green lenses. Wearing the glasses, Mike was able to see the letters lined up in the proper order and track from the end of one line to the beginning of the next … for twenty minutes at a time.  It takes only twenty minutes for the brain to reprogram itself.  this is called the Hawthorne Effect. By taking the glasses off and putting them on every twenty minutes he was able to do his schoolwork and to devour the books that he had been unable to read.  The yellow lenses worked best.  Our next bit of fortune was finding a remarkable woman who had developed a system of reprogramming the brain.  Though challenging, it was successful.  The colored glasses found their way to the bottom of his drawer.  They had turned his life around and given him hope that his dream of being an astronaut might still come true.  He now works for Moon Express, with the goal of winning the Google Lunar X Prize.

Drawing: drawn first with fountain pen filled with Noodler’s Rome Burning Ink, followed by watercolor.  I decided not to paint the black ear pieces.  I didn’t want to distract from the colored lenses.

My potted herbs offer a variety of leaf shapes and an opportunity to play with warm greens and cool greens.

Potted Herb Plants

I braved the heat to sit outside and draw a selection of potted kitchen herbs.  I was hoping for at least one good thunderstorm to refresh the fields of corn and the crunchy grass.  No such luck.  Thanks to my watering cans, the herbs are still alive, though not thriving.

Drawn en plein air.  Line drawing using an old Scheaffer fountain pen filled with Noodler’s black ink, followed by watercolor.  Color Palette: Phthalo Blue, French Ultramarine Blue, Carmine, Cadmium Red Scarlet, Cadmium Yellow, Gamboge, Viridian.  I used only a tip’s worth of the Carmine and the Cadmium Red Scarlet to tone down the green in a few areas.

Yesterday I completed the last of the 100 drawings / paintings in the Trumpet Parts Series.

Trumpet Parts No. 100 with the felt ball I made for Baer’s 3rd Birthday (today).  The roving was from Tari’s sheep.

The last three drawings are ink squiggle drawings.  I will keep only my favorite piece, T2-R2, from the box of bent and broken trumpet parts.  I enjoyed every moment of working on the series.  The series began in April of 2011.  It documents the passage of time, the change of seasons, my interests, my experiments with a variety of media and styles, as well as the development of The Color Scheme Game.

Trumpet Parts No. 98

Most of the series was done in sketchbooks, helping me to fill the remaining blank pages of at least seven of the sixty-six incomplete sketchbooks on my bookshelves.

Trumpet Parts No. 99

The series acted as a mirror, making me aware of my work habits, my style preferences, my color preferences as well as the consistency of quality (and absence of quality) that is directly connected with the level of focus on the work.

The entire series (minus a few that were horrific) may be viewed in the Trumpet Parts Album of  my facebook page Chris Carter Artist.

Moving on …….

Sketchbook Drawings:  drawn with Noodler’s Neponset fountain pen (fabulous pen!) filled with Noodler’s Heart of Darkness Ink.

I couldn’t resist at least one more ink squiggle drawing of my Trumpet Parts before I reach the end of the series.

Trumpet Parts No. 97, Ink Squiggle Drawing

I find myself having rested on my current plateau a tad too long, staring at the rock face of the cliff on the far end of the plateau.  Time to start the ascent to the next level.  With that in mind, I will be posting less frequently on this blog as well as the Creative Color blog, perhaps only once or twice a week.  Thanks for viewing the blogs, for your comments, and for your continued support.

Sketchbook drawing: drawn with Noodler’s Neponset fountain pen filled with Heart of Darkness Ink.

This modified triad color scheme is the same as an extended analogous color scheme with two colors omitted.

Trumpet Parts No. 96

Blue / Violet, Blue / Green and Green / Yellow.  The Two colors omitted are Blue and Green.  I felt like the color sketch was screaming for a bit of orange so I filled in the closed shapes in the title and date.  Whew….. a bit of relief from the overpowering frogginess of the trumpet parts.

Sketchbook color sketch: drawn first in ink with fountain pen, followed by watercolor on thin, wrinkly paper.

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